Entrepreneurial Studies 329/629

This course is a practicum, offering an opportunity to apply collective team work of a student/mentor alliance to building a launch pad for a technology-based venture. This course is open to Ross School MBA and BBA students as well as all UM graduate students. Student teams will work with mentors and principal investigators (PI) from UM faculty in the Medical School, College of Engineering and other divisions to build a business and marketing plan for a new technology or invention.

Entrepreneurship 599

***Note: ENTR 599 is a special topics course and the topics may change across terms. The special topic of "Organizational Values & Ethics" has been approved by the Curriculum and Assessment Committee for professional elective credit. Students wishing to take this course where the topic is different must submit a request to the Curriculum and Assessment Committee for review and approval.

Course overview for Org Values & Ethics in Entrepreneurship:

Biostatistics 522

A second course in applied biostatistical methods and data analysis. Concepts of data analysis and experimental design for health-related studies. Emphasis on categorical data analysis, multiple regression, analysis of variance and covariance.

Technology & Operations 616

This course focuses on strategies and tools useful in management of non-repetitive business activities.  Examples of such activities include construction, new product development and market introduction, consulting engagements, and organization restructurings.  Tools to be introduced include work breakdown structure, network representation, PERT/CPM models and analysis, Gantt charts, time and cost models, PM software, and probabilistic analysis.  Strategy considerations covered will include dealing with uncertainty, resource constraints, dealing with shared and requested vs.

Finance 329/629

This course is a practicum, offering an opportunity to apply collective team work of a student/mentor alliance to building a launch pad for a technology-based venture. This course is open to Ross School MBA and BBA students as well as all UM graduate students. Student teams will work with mentors and principal investigators (PI) from UM faculty in the Medical School, College of Engineering and other divisions to build a business and marketing plan for a new technology or invention.

Chemical Engineering 588

This course is for scientists, engineers, and clinicians to understand and interpret various relevant global and regional quality systems for traditional and cutting edge global health technologies, solutions and their implementation. Speakers from academia, the FDA, and biomedical related industries will be invited to participate in teaching this course.

Cross-listed with Biomedical Engineering 588.

Technology and Operations 563

New business models built around operational efficiency offer tremendous potential to improve people's health worldwide. This course will examine how innovations in business models, operations, financing and supply chains are allowing far more people to access better quality healthcare.

Health Management and Policy 661

This course prepares students to take on management challenges faced in health informatics leadership roles within a variety of organizational settings.

Business Administration 612

The condition of the world's poor is the subject of growing attention. Global poverty is increasingly seen as an unacceptable outcome of the current economic system, and there is interest in exploring new market-based approaches to poverty alleviation. The emerging base of the pyramid (BoP) perspective aligns business-oriented incentives for growth, innovation, and profits with the development community's efforts to create a more inclusive capitalism.

School of Information 554

Consumer health informatics (CHI) gives health care consumers information and tools to facilitate their engagement.  Students will become familiar with, and evaluate, a range of CHI applications.  They will also assess the needs and technological practices of potential users, generate theory-informed design and implementation strategies, and select appropriate evaluation approaches.

Cross listed with HBHE 654. 

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