Medicinal Chemistry 500
Principles of Drug Action I
(Credits: 3)

This course introduces the concepts required to understand drugs as organic chemicals whose biological activities derive from their chemical structures and physicochemical properties, including drug metabolism, signal transduction and drug-receptor interactions.  The course continues with a survey of different analytical methods used to assay pharmaceuticals. 

Prerequisites: First Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 501
Chemical Biology I [Cross-listed with BiolChem 501]
(Credits: 3)

This course provides a high-level overview on the structure, function and chemistry of biological macromolecules including proteins, nucleic acids and carbohydrates. Topics include: molecular forces, structure, and dynamics: understanding macromolecular folding, energetics of macromolecular interactions (kinetics and thermodynamics), ligand binding and mechanistic enzymology. Using specific examples from current literature, each topic stresses how chemists have used molecular level tools and probes to help understand the specific systems under study. The overarching theme is that biological structure and function are interconnected.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 502
Chemical Biology II [Cross-listed with BiolChem 502]
(Credits: 3)

This course is a continuation of Chemical Biology 501. The basic concepts obtained in Chemical Biology 501 will be applied to and demonstrated in three broad areas of interest to both chemists and biologists. The first topic discusses protein homeostasis (both biosynthesis and degradation). The second topic focuses on signal transduction, emphasizing general concepts (at the molecular level) and how small molecules have been used to probe and modulate signal transduction pathways. The final topic covers chemical biology tools and approaches (selections, screens, small molecule libraries, genomics, proteomics, directed evolution and catalytic antibodies).

Prerequisites: Chemical Biology 501
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 510
Principles of Drug Action II
(Credits: 3)

This course is a continuation of MedChem 500 and covers the pathophysiology of disorders of the autonomic nervous system and the cariovascular system with a survey of drugs acting on these systems, their mechanisms of action, structure activity relationship and other issues related to their pharmacology and clinical use.

Prerequisites: MedChem 500
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 511
Drug Assay
(Credits: 1)

This course provides hands-on experience of a number of laboratory techniques commonly used in drug analysis with an emphasis on data interpretation, pharmaceutical calculation and statistical analysis.  

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment with MedChem 510
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 528
Protein Cofactors [Cross-listed with Chemistry 528]
(Credits: 2)

This course explores the roles of organic and organometallic cofactors in biology. Topics covered are cofactor assembly, cofactors as sensors, and cofactors in enzyme chemistry, with an emphasis on modulation of cofactor reactivity by complexation with the protein.

Prerequisites: Biochemistry 452 or Chemistry 452, or equivalent, or permission of instructor
Instructor: Matthews
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 532
Bioorganic Principles of Medicinal Chemistry
(Credits: 2)

A mechanistic organic chemistry/biochemistry approach to medicinal chemistry, emphasizing macromolecular targets of drug action. The first of six sections focuses on receptors and ligand-receptor interactions, stressing energetics and stereochemical considerations. Section two deals with enzymes as drug targets, with emphasis on inhibitors of enzyme action. Section three explores metabolic pathways and mechanisms for xenobiotic transformation. Section four discusses DNA as a target for drug action and includes agents that interact with DNA directly and those that inhibit its synthesis. Section five covers the rationale behind pro-drug approaches as well as design strategies based on routes of bioactivation. Section six is a brief overview of biotechnology approaches with important benefits for drug discovery.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 540, Biochemistry 550, or permission of instructor
Instructor: Larsen
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 533
Survey of Therapeutics
(Credits: 2)

Offered alternate Winter Terms. Survey of major drug classes with emphasis on molecular mechanisms of action.  Target identification with chemical probes.  

Prerequisites: Medicinal Chemistry 532 or permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 534
Drug Discovery
(Credits: 3)

Offered alternate Winter Terms. Survey of methods used in contemporary pharmaceutical research including computational and combinatorial approaches, and high-throughput analysis of drug efficacy and metabolism.

Prerequisites: Medicinal Chemistry 532, or permission of instructor
Instructor: Carlson
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 535
Principles of Drug Design
(Credits: 2)

Sources of leads.  Lead selection from HTS and virtual screening.  General design principles.  Drug design with defined target structure.  Drug design without defined target structure.  ADMET Optimization.  Case Histories.  

Prerequisites: MedChem 532 or Permission of Instructor
Instructor: Larsen
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 550
Ethics & Research [Cross-listed with Pharmacology 504]
(Credits: .5)

Ethics & Research 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 570
Research
(Credits: 1-6)

The experiences will vary depending on the specific faculty member's project but may include: conducting clinical or basic science research, performing an extensive review of the literature and preparing a summary report/manuscript, analyzing data that has previously been collected. Students may work on a single project or be exposed to several types of projects during the course. For specific details of the course, students should contact individual faculty.

Prerequisites: PharmD students. Permission of instructor.
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 573
Investigations in Medicinal Chemistry
(Credits: 1-6)

Original investigation of a laboratory or library problem to be selected after consultation with the instructor. A paper is required.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 600
Principles of Drug Action III
(Credits: 4)

This course is a continuation of Medicinal Chemistry 510 and includes a survey of drugs used in arrhythmias, hyperlipidemia, angina, congestive heart failure and diabetes, plus drugs acting on the central nervous system.  The course covers basic pharmacological concepts, structure activity relationship, mechanism of action, DDIs, adverse effects and clinical use of these drugs.

Prerequisites: MedChem 510
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 610
Principles of Drug Action III
(Credits: 5)

This course is a continuation of Medicinal Chemistry 510 and 600 and includes a survey of antibiotics, antiviral and anticancer agents, pharmaceutical biotechnology and immunotherapy, covering structure activity relationship, mechanism of action and other issues related to the pharmacology and clinical use of related agents.

Prerequisites: MedChem 600
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 617
Exploring Pharmacy; Past, Present and Future
(Credits: 2)

A survey of the past, present and future of pharmacy in the context of drug discovery, including such topics as the history of pharmacy, pharmaceutical biotechnology and personalized medicine.  The course examines the current state of global healthcare and its impact on drug discovery and the future of pharmacy.

Prerequisites: Second year PharmD students or permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 621
Translational Pharmacology: From Drug Discovery to Therapeutics [Cross-listed with Pharmacology 621]
(Credits: 2)

Experts from academica and industry will take you on a journey from bench science to new therapeutic agents.  Students will learn how to translate preclincial studies to clinical trials adn FDA approval.  Critical evaluation of clinical trials, patent issues and pharmacoeconomics will also be taught.

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of opharmacologic principles and permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 635
Advanced Topics
(Credits: 2)

Advanced Topics in Medicinal Chemistry 

Prerequisites: Medicinal Chemistry 532 and 533 or permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 660
Responsible Conduct of Research and Scholarship in Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Michigan
(Credits: 1 (half credit each term))

This course teaches students about ethics and integrity in science.  It takes advantage of case studies that link basic principles with specific examples, providing students with opportunities to discuss and develop concepts related to ethics and scientific integrity.  A major teaching tool will be the use of case studies where students discuss model cases and are challenged to apply their own knowledge as well as their personal experiences and insights in order to derive appropriate solutions to the problems posed.  This course is aimed at the predoctoral students at the College of Pharmacy. 

Prerequisites: Graduate students at the College of Pharmacy, with permission of instructor
Instructor: Woodard
Terms: Fall/Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 700
Drug Assay
(Credits: 3)

A capstone course for the Medicinal Chemistry/Pharmacology sequence through a survey of different drug classes and the various techniques used to assay their concentration in biological samples.  The course provides hands-on experience of a number of laboratory techniques commonly used in drug analysis with an emphasis on data interpretation.

Prerequisites: MedChem 610
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 709
PharmD Investigations - Research Proposal
(Credits: 1)

The first in a sequence of courses needed to complete the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This component of the series includes the written research proposal.  A grade will be submitted upon the successful submission and final approval of the proposal by the PharmD Investigations Committee.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 719
PharmD Investigations - Research Data
(Credits: 2)

The second in a sequence of three courses needed for the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This semester of the series is designed for students to obtain hands on experience in conducting their research and collecting and analyzing all research data. Students work under the supervision of their faculty mentor to develop data collection forms and methods to archive data in a way that facilitates their analysis.

Prerequisites: Medicinal Chemistry PharmD Investigations - Research Proposal
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 739 (formerly 585 )
PharmD Investigations - Research Report
(Credits: 1)

The third in a sequence of courses needed to complete the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This course in the series is designed for students to gain experience writing a research report, after completing data collection and analysis.  Students work under the supervision of their faculty mentor and submit the final report to the Investigations Committee.

Prerequisites: Medicinal Chemistry PharmD Investigations - Research Data
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 740
Preparing a Research Grant Proposal
(Credits: 1)

The course consists of several interactive lectures and workshops about the process of grant writing.  The students select a research topic for an NIH R21-type grant propsal, complete a draft, and present it to the class for peer feedback.  


Instructor: Soellner
Terms: Fall
Medicinal Chemistry 741
Defending an Original Research Proposal
(Credits: 1)

The students finalize the research proposal drafted in MedChem 740 and make an oral presentation to their committee.  

Prerequisites: MedChem 740
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 840
Medicinal Chemistry Seminar
(Credits: 1)

Weekly or Bi-weekly Medicinal Chemistry Seminar Series featuring lecturers from University of Michigan, or other outside institutions.  


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 990
Dissertation/Precandidacy
(Credits: 2-8)

Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to candidacy.

Prerequisites: Advanced doctoral student status
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Medicinal Chemistry 995
Dissertation/Candidacy
(Credits: 4-8)

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student admitted to candidacy.

Prerequisites: Doctoral candidacy
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 101
Intro to Drug Development
(Credits: 2)

This is an introductory course for undergraduates, primarily freshman and sophomore level students, who are interested in various aspects of the science behind the drug development process.  This course will cover the process of drug discovery and development, introduction to different aspects of basic and applied sciences involved in drug candidate identifications, and how candidate molecules are made into drugs and drug products in the clinic and market.

Prerequisites: College level introductory Chemistry, Physics, or Biology
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 508
Drug Delivery and Solutions
(Credits: 3)

Basic principles of drug delivery are developed with respect to identifying and characterizing biological and physical-chemical barriers to the bioavailability of drugs.  Routes of drug delivery and related dosage forms are also introduced.  Specific emphasis is placed on building principles and solving problems in equilibria, transport, and chemical kinetics of drug solutions as they relate to liquid dosage form performance.

Prerequisites: Chemistry 216 and Physics 216
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 518
Drug Delivery and Drugs in Dispersed Systems and Solid Forms
(Credits: 3)

Course content includes the formulation, development and approval process of dosage forms comprised of disperesed phases (suspensions and emusions) and solid phases (amorphous and crystalline).  The course integrates physicochemical and concepts with quality and performance of topical, oral and inhalation dosage forms. 

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Sciences 508
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 519
Pharmaceutical Engineering [Cross-listed with Chemical Engineering 519]
(Credits: 3)

Offered in conjunction with the interdisciplinary Masters of Engineering in Pharmaceutical Engineering (M.Eng.) program, this course covers the concepts necessary to adapt engineering principles to pharmaceutical and life sciences related industries. Topics include process engineering in the drug discovery, high throughput characterization and optimization of new chemical entities, solid-state engineering, and intelligent pharmaceutical manufacturing systems. Lectures, problems, and Internet and library study will be used to develop the ideas presented.

Prerequisites: Senior or graduate standing, permission of instructor.
Instructor: Amidon
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 568
Investigations in Pharmaceutics
(Credits: 1-6)

Original investigation of a laboratory or library problem to be selected after consultation with the instructor. A paper is required.

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 570
Research
(Credits: 1-6)

The experiences will vary depending on the specific faculty member's project but may include: conducting clinical or basic science research, performing an extensive review of the literature and preparing a summary report/manuscript, analyzing data that has previously been collected. Students may work on a single project or be exposed to several types of projects during the course. For specific details of the course, students should contact individual faculty.

Prerequisites: PharmD students. Permission of instructor.
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 608
Pharmacokinetic Concepts and Applications
(Credits: 4)

This course is the third of four required courses in the pharmaceutical sciences curriculum.  Course content includes the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs and drug-related species by the body.  Emphasis is placed on the use (not the derivation) of pharmacokinetic/dynamic models and equations.  Additional emphasis is placed on designing suitable dosage regimens for the treatment and prevention of disease in humans. Three lecture hours and one discussion hour a week.

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Sciences 518
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 700
Biopharmaceutics and Drug Disposition
(Credits: 3)

Offered alternate Fall Terms. This entry level course is designed for 1st or 2nd year graduate students in the pharmaceutical or related biomedical sciences.  The course focuses on the ADME concepts of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and basic pharmacokinetic/dynamic modeling, along with  transport, transporters, drug metabolism, and pharmacogenomics.  One and one-half hour lectures are held twice a week. 


Instructor: Smith
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 701
Pharmaceutical Design, Delivery and Targeting – Physical-Chemical Concepts
(Credits: 3)

Offered alternate Fall Terms. This course focuses on the physical-chemical concepts of drug design, delivery and targeting.  The fundamental principles of drug molecules in physical pharmacy, formulation, and drug delivery technologies are covered in this course.

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing
Instructor: Rodriguez
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 702
Pharmaceutical Design, Delivery and Targeting – Biomolecular Concepts
(Credits: 3)

Offered alternate Fall Terms. This course focuses on the biological and molecular concepts of drug design, delivery and targeting.  The fundamental principles of cell biology and molecular biology will be applied to drug design, targeted drug delivery, and cellular drug delivery.

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing
Instructor: Lee
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 703
Advanced Physicochemical Concepts of Drug Development and Delivery
(Credits: 3)

Offered alternate Winter Terms. This course focuses on the advanced physicochemical and molecular concepts of drug development, formulation design, and drug delivery which follows from introductory concepts in PharmSci 701.  The importance of solution chemistry, interfacial chemistry, and materials chemistry in pharmaceutical sciences will be presented. 

Prerequisites: PharmSci 701, Math 216 or equivalent
Instructor: Schwendeman
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 705
Nanotechnology for Drug Delivery
(Credits: 3)

This course will detail recent advances made in the interdisciplinary field of nanomedicine for students with physical, chemical, or biological sciences background.  This course will focus on emerging nanotechnologies, and their biomedical applications, including nanomaterials, nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems, nano-based thranostics, and translation of nanomedicine into clinical trials and commercialization.  

Prerequisites: Graduate students or permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 706
Biologic Products: Recombinant Proteins, Cell Therapies and Biosimilars
(Credits: 2)

In 2016 the top selling drugs are monoclonal antibodies, and half of the new drugs approved are biopharmaceuticals and numerous biosimilars are being developed.  This class is about how biologic drugs are discovered, manufactured, formulated, analyzed, developed and regulated - now essential information for scientists seeking careers in the pharmaceutical industry.  

Prerequisites: Graduate students
Instructor: Schwendeman
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 709
PharmD Investigations - Research Proposal
(Credits: 1)

The first in a sequence of courses needed to complete the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This component of the series includes the written research proposal.  A grade will be submitted upon the successful submison and final approval of the proposal by the PharmD Investigations Committee.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 718
Modern Biopharmaceutics and Pharmacogenomics
(Credits: 2)

A course in Modern Biopharmaceutics and the recent advances in Pharmacogenetics and Genomics. The course will cover the oral absorption and metabolism of drugs from a classical and modern molecular perspective including discussion of current FDA Bioequivalence (BE) regulatory standards. It will also cover the most recent advances in pharmacogenomic and genetic test methods particularly as they relate to the selectivity and variability, in patients, of drug toxicity and efficacy.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 719
PharmD Investigations - Research Data
(Credits: 2)

The second in a sequence of three courses needed for the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This semester of the series is designed for students to obtain hands on experience in conducting their research and collecting and analyzing all research data. Students work under the supervision of their faculty mentor to develop data collection forms and methods to archive data in a way that facilitates their analysis.

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Sciences PharmD Investigations - Research Proposal
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 739 (formerly 585 )
PharmD Investigations - Research Report
(Credits: 1)

The third in a sequence of courses needed to complete the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This course in the series is designed for students to gain experience writing a research report, after completing data collection and analysis.  Students work under the supervision of their faculty mentor and submit the final report to the Investigations Committee.

Prerequisites: Pharmaceutical Sciences PharmD Investigations - Research Data
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmaceutical Sciences 755
Advanced Topics
(Credits: 2)

Advanced Topics in Pharmaceutics


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 760
Advanced Pharmacokinetics and Biopharmaceutics
(Credits: 3)

Offered alternate Winter Terms. A continuation of the basic concepts introduced in PharmSci 518 (formerly 464) or PharmSci 700.  The course emphasizes the derivation and use of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic equations, methods of data analysis, and computer applications including the use of WinNonlin and NONMEM.  One and one-half hour lectures are held twice a week.

Prerequisites: Math 216 (Differential Equations) and PharmSci 518 or 700 (Basic Pharmacokinetics); or permission of instructor. A course in statistics would be helpful.
Instructor: Smith
Terms: Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 838
Seminar in Pharmaceutics
(Credits: 1)

Reports on current studies in the field of Pharmaceutical Sciences.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 990
Dissertation/Precandidacy
(Credits: 2-8)

Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to candidacy.

Prerequisites: Advanced doctoral student status
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmaceutical Sciences 995
Dissertation/Candidacy
(Credits: 4-8)

Election for dissertation work by doctoral students admitted to candidacy.

Prerequisites: Doctoral candidacy
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 501
Introduction to Pharmacy
(Credits: 2.5)

This course explores the profession of pharmacy and its evolution.  The course will evaluate and discuss the role of pharmacists and pharmacy practice as they relate to patient care, other health professionals, and roles in state and federal health care issues.  The concept of professionalism will be explored and reflected upon during the course.  Students will have the opportunity to participate in different activities in the clinical setting and to engage with other health professionals.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 503
Service Learning for Health Professionals
(Credits: 2)

This service-based course explores issues of health disparities, poverty, and the medically-underserved through an inter-professional lens.  The course is open to all health professions students. Students complete 20 hours of direct service to a health center or community agency and attend up to 7 class discussion sessions.  For more information about this course, visit:  https://pharmacy.umich.edu/service


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 504
Pharmacy Practice Skills I
(Credits: 3)

This course is the first in the pharmacy practice skills series that focuses on contemporary community pharmacy practice.  Topics covered include introduction to law, interpretation of prescriptions, principles of compounding and dispensing of medications, pharmaceutical calculations, top 50 medications, introduction to drug information, and activities related to health promotion and disease prevention in the community setting.  


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 506
Patient Communications
(Credits: 2)

Students will engage in activities reinforcing key communications skills, including patient interviewing and counseling.  The role of cultural influences on communication of health information is explored.  Students also work on these skills outside the classroom with a community partner.  The skills learned in this course will be reinforced throughout the PharmD curriculum.  Two hours of lecture/discussion and 3 hours lab per week.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 511
Life Long Learning 1
(Credits: .50)

The Life-Long Learning (IPPE/APPE) course promotes professional development, commitment to self-improvement, accountability for one’s learning as well as work and commitment to excellence.  Over the course of the term, students are required to independently complete a variety of professional development IPPE activities.  Independent study.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 512
Nonprescription Therapeutics and Self-Care
(Credits: 4)

This course is the first in a five-semester sequence on therapeutic problem solving, and emphasizes nonprescription therapies for the self-treating patient.  Students learn a systematic approach to assessing, triaging and treating self-treatable conditions and about over-the-counter medications.  Active learning strategies are employed.

Prerequisites: First year PharmD fall-term coursework
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 514
Pharmacy Practice Skills II
(Credits: 3)

This course continues the process of developming skills needed for pharmaceutical care, including gathering information to complete a patient a patient database using the medication history, comprehensive drug therapy assessment, identification of medication related problems, creation of the pharmacist’s care plan, and enhancement of both written and verbal communication skills, focusing on communication with patients and other health care providers.

Prerequisites: Pharmacy 500, 504 and 506
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 516
Health Care Systems
(Credits: 2)

The purpose of this course is to understand and analyze the various components of the United States Health care system with attention to the role of cost, access, pharmaceuticals, and the health care organization, government and health care professionals.  This knowledge allows pharmacists to effectively navigate the health system for themselves, their patients, and society.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 557 (formerly 554 )
Performance Enhancing Substance & The Athlete
(Credits: 2)

This course explores the use and abuse of substances to enhance athletic performance and, to a lesser extent, body image.  Content includes the prevalence and epidemiology of substance use and in-depth topic discussions covering a variety of agents focused on evidence of efficacy/benefits, and medical and societal issues related to use of these substances. 


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 570
Research
(Credits: 1-6)

The experiences will vary depending on the specific faculty member's project but may include: conducting clinical or basic science research, performing an extensive review of the literature and preparing a summary report/manuscript, analyzing data that has previously been collected. Students may work on a single project or be exposed to several types of projects during the course. For specific details of the course, students should contact individual faculty.

Prerequisites: PharmD students. Permission of instructor.
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 580
Special Topics
(Credits: 1-6)

An in-depth discussion of selected pharmacy- and medication-related issues. Students will be expected to provide in-class presentations and write a paper.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 597
Regulatory Issues for Scientists, Engineers, and Managers
(Credits: 2)

Science- and technology-based rationale behind various regulatory issues involved in pharmaceutical and related industries.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 602
Therapeutic Problem Solving I
(Credits: 4)

Second in a five-part sequence which integrates the pathophysiology and therapeutics of diseases.  The focus is on drug therapy and applied pharmacokinetics of common chronic and acute conditions, including hypertension and diabetes.  The role of evidence based medicine in regard to therapeutic decisions is emphasized and builds upon basic biological, pharmacological and pharmaceutical sciences.  Developing pharmaceutical care plans that build skills on recommending therapy, evaluating and monitoring the efficacy and safety of medications for an individual patients is also emphasized.

Prerequisites: MedChem 510 and concurrent with MedChem 600 and PharmSci 608
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 603
Community Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience
(Credits: 2)

This course is designed to enhance pharmacy skills learned earlier in the program through hands-on experience dispensing medications, drug therapy assessments, counseling patients about presription and nonprescription medications, communicating with other health care professionals, and completing special written projects or presentations.  Eight hours per week of supervised experience in a community pharmacy.

Prerequisites: Second Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 604
Evidenced Based Medicine
(Credits: 3)

This course teaches the principles of drug information and literature evaluation using the concepts of evidence based practice. Skills include identifying resources to answer clinical questions, developing search strategies, and critically evaluating scientific literature allowing students to identify and utilize the best evidence to make decisions regarding patient care.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 611
Life Long Learning 2
(Credits: .25)

This course teaches the principles of drug information and literature evaluation using the concepts of evidence based practice. Skills include identifying resources to answer clinical questions, developing search strategies, and critically evaluating scientific literature allowing students to identify and utilize the best evidence to make decisions regarding patient care.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 612
Therapeutic Problem Solving II
(Credits: 4)

Third of a five-part course sequence which integrates the pathophysiology and therapeutics of diseases.  The focus is on drug therapy and applied pharmacokinetics of common and acute conditions in areas such as women's health and pediatrics among others.  Class time is devoted to discussion and a laboratory.  A team based interactive approach to teaching is an essential part of the course series.  Since class time is devoted to discussion and a lab, it is essential that students come prepared for class.  Outside classroom assignments will be an essential component of the course.

Prerequisites: MedChem 600, Pharmacy 602 and concurrent with MedChem 610
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 614
Principles of Research and Problem Solving
(Credits: 2)

This is an introductory course in research methods and proposal writing.  The course is designed to give students experience in hypothesis and specific aims development and an overview of scientific study design.  The course objectives will be accomplished through didactic lecture and small group and individual assignments.  Ultimately, each student will write a brief research proposal that follows a similar format to the PharmD Investigations proposal.  In addition, students will present their research idea to peers in a poster/abstract format.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 616
Health-System Pharmacy Practice, Leadership and Management
(Credits: 3)

This course is taught and assessed to establish best practices in health-system pharmacy and is designed to develop tomorrow's practitioners and leaders in health-system pharmacy practice.  Class discussions and laboratory assignments will provide active learning opportunities for students to practice health-system skills and techniques.

Prerequisites: Second Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 617
Current Topics in Therapeutics
(Credits: 1)

This elective course will cover a range of therapeutics topics that are not typically covered in the core Therapeutic Problem Solving sequence.  The course will expose students to two different teaching pedagogies, team-based learning and standard lecture format.

Prerequisites: Pharmacy students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 620
Pharmacotherapeutics I
(Credits: 3)

The goal of this course is to prepare nurse practitioners and graduate nurse practitioner students in the clinical applications of drugs commonly used in primary care of the management of acute and chronic diseases.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing or permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 621
Pharmacotherapeutics II
(Credits: 3)

The goal of this course is to prepare nurse practitioners and graduate nurse practitioner student sin the clinical applications of drugs commonly used in primary care of the management of acute and chronic diseases.

Prerequisites: Graduate standing in the School of Nursing or permission of instructor.
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 627
Introduction to Specialty Pharmacy
(Credits: 1)

This course will provide students the opportunity to familiarize themselves with the specialty pharmacy industry.  Students will be exposed to market trends, best practices, various practice settings, patient populations, and clinical programs and outcomes.  Students will present hot topics and attend a key opinion leader panel discussion.  

Prerequisites: Successful completion of the first year of the PharmD program
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 647
Clinical Trials for Translational Scientists
(Credits: 2)

In this multidisciplinary course students will design their own clinical trial by being part of a T0-T3 translational research team.  Topics covered include trial design, ethical issues, managing the study team, study conduct, IRB and regulatory practice, protecting and respecting participants, managing data and data safety, and communicating findings.  

Prerequisites: Statistics or Biostatistics, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Pharmacy 614 or Pharmacology 640
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 702
Therapeutic Problem Solving III
(Credits: 4)

The focus of this course is on drug therapy and applied pharamcokinetics of common and acute conditions related to mental health, nephrology, and infectious diseases.  The role of evidence based medicine in regard to therapeutic decisions is emphasized and builds upon basic biological, pharmacological and pharmaceutical sciences.  Developing pharmaceutical care plans that build skills on recommending therapy, evaluating and monitoring the efficacy and safety of medications for individual patients is also emphasized.

Prerequisites: Pharmacy 612
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 703
Health Systems/Hospital IPPE
(Credits: 2)

This course is designed to enhance the pharmacy skills learned earlier in the program by providing hands-on experience dispensing medications, conducting drug therapy assessments, counseling patients about prescription medications, communicating with other health care practitioners, and completing special written projects or presentations. Eight hours per week of supervised supervised experiences in the hospital pharmacy setting.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 704
EBM/Ethics Clinical Application
(Credits: 1)

This course builds on the principles and skills taught in Pharmacy 604 regarding evidence based medicine.  These skills and principles include drug information and literature evaluation, developing search strategies and critically evaluating scientific literature, applying the evidence in clinical practice, and exploring principals of ethics and ethical dilemmas that present challenges to the clinical practitioner.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 706
Pharmacy Healthcare Outcomes
(Credits: 2)

The purpose of this course is to introduce concepts of effectiveness of pharmaceuticals to professional pharmacy students. The evaluation of effectiveness includes introduction of diverse topics such as drug utilization evaluation, pharmacoepdemiology, patient reported outcomes, medication error reduction, pharmaceutical policy/procedure development,health disparities, pharmacoeconomics, medication use-related database evaluation and basic concepts of Public health. 

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 709
PharmD Investigations - Research Proposal
(Credits: 1)

The first in a sequence of courses needed to complete the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This component of the series includes the written research proposal.  A grade will be submitted upon the successful submison and final approval of the proposal by the PharmD Investigations Committee.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 711
Life Long Learning 3
(Credits: .25)

The third course in a series of professional development courses, following Pharmacy 511 and Pharmacy 611.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 712
Therapeutic Problem Solving IV
(Credits: 3)

The last in a sequence of courses that integrate the pathophysiology and therapeutics of diseases.  The focus is on drug therapy and applied pharmacokinetics of common and acute conditions related to oncology, rheumatology, hepatology, cardiology and others.  The class includes discussion sesssions and a laboratory.  A team-based, interactive approach to teaching is an essential part of the course series.  Since class time is devoted to discussion and a lab, it is essential that students come prepared for class.  Outside classroom assignments are an essential component of the course.

Prerequisites: Pharmacy 702
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 713
Direct Patient Care Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience
(Credits: 1)

This course builds upon the skills learned earlier in the program.  It facilitates the development of pharmaceutical care skills through students' participation in patient care initiatives that contribute to the role of pharmacists in health care.  Emphasis is on developing these skills: patient data collection, medication assessment, pharmaceutical care plans involving evidence-based recommendations, chart notes, and written, interpersonal and interprofessional communication skills.  Four hours of direct patient care experience per week.   

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 714
Team-Based Clinical Decision Making
(Credits: 2)

This inter-professional course is designed for students in: dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work.  The course allows health professional students to gain an understanding of how each discipline contributes to the healthcare team and the importance of effective communication and team collaboration to clinical decision making.  


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 716
Pharmacy Law
(Credits: 2)

This course emphasizes the application of pertinent laws, rules, and regulations to the practice of pharmacy.  Students will gain an understanding of the rules and regulations governing the practice of pharmacy through faculty lecture, classroom discussion, and assignments.  Students will also learn where to find information regarding pharmacy law that they will continue to use through their professional life. 

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 719
PharmD Investigations - Research Data
(Credits: 2)

The second in a sequence of three courses needed for the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This semester of the series is designed for students to obtain hands on experience in conducting their research and collecting and analyzing all research data. Students work under the supervision of their faculty mentor to develop data collection forms and methods to archive data in a way that facilitates their analysis.

Prerequisites: Pharmacy PharmD Investigations - Research Proposal
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 723
Pharmacy Practice Skills III
(Credits: 1)

This course is designed to develop and enhance patient care skills in the management of the most common chronic disease states managed in the ambulatory care environment. Students will enrich their patient care skills and core clinical communication skills through a combination of individual and group activities.     

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 727
Career and Professional Development
(Credits: 2)

This course explores a variety of topics, including unique opportunities for pharmacists in industry, government, professional writing; the pros and cons of post-graduate training (fellowships, residencies, Ph.D., etc.); how to get the “perfect job”; job interview techniques; pros and cons of board certification; how to become professionally active; and balancing both professional and personal demands. 

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 730 (formerly 680 )
PharmD Seminar
(Credits: 1)

A formal seminar is presented by each student to the fourth-year PharmD class and selected faculty on topics ranging from patient case studies to the analysis of pharmacy practice problems. Each seminar topic is directed by a faculty preceptor and includes a question and answer period and discussion questions.

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Pharmacy 731
Life Long Learning 4
(Credits: .25)

The fourth course in a series of professional development courses.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 733
Pharmacy Practice Skills IV
(Credits: 1)

This course builds on the skills learned in the Therapeutic Problem Solving series and facilitates further development of aspects of the pharmacists’ patient care process, preparing students for subsequent advanced pharmacy practice experiences.  Emphasis is placed on developing the following clinical skills:  data collection through use of the electronic medical record, drug therapy assessment, written patient-centered care plans including evidence-based recommendations, SOAP note documentation, drug information retrieval, oral case presentations and other formal presentations.

Prerequisites: Third year pharmacy students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 739 (formerly 585 )
PharmD Investigations - Research Report
(Credits: 1)

The third in a sequence of courses needed to complete the PharmD Investigations requirement.  This course in the series is designed for students to gain experience writing a research report, after completing data collection and analysis.  Students work under the supervision of their faculty mentor and submit the final report to the Investigations Committee.

Prerequisites: Pharmacy PharmD Investigations - Research Data
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 747
Pediatric Pharmacotherapy
(Credits: 2)

This course provides disease-oriented, pharmacy-oriented insight into the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and rational drug treatment of diseases primarily encountered in the pediatric age group. Emphasis is on the pharmacist’s role in selecting drug products, individualizing dosages, and monitoring patients. Two hours lecture, case discussion a week.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 757
The Aging Patient
(Credits: 2)

Sensitization to health and social status of the elderly. The course is designed to facilitate successful interaction with the aged on personal and professional levels through discussion of: physiologic changes and normal and pathologic aging; important medical conditions most common among the aged; the impact of chronic illness; issues in death and dying; modifications in drug therapy for the aged person; and the role of the pharmacist in caring for the elderly. Two hours lecture a week.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 767
Introduction to Critical Care Pharmacotherapy
(Credits: 2)

This course provides a basic overview of key concepts in critical care. Course content includes the principles of hemodynamic monitoring and the pathophysiology and management of selected diseases affecting major organ systems and requiring intensive care therapy.

Prerequisites: Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 787 (formerly 687 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 1
(Credits: 4)

Each of the required advanced pharmacy practice experiences provide five weeks of supervised pharmacy practice for at least 40 hours per week.  The advanced pharmacy practice experiences are conducted in community, institutional, inpatient care, ambulatory care, drug information, and nontraditional care practice settings throughout southeast Michigan, or a select out-of-state sites.  A minimum of eight experiences are required in the final year of the PharmD program and one additional experience may be scheduled, upon request of the student.

Prerequisites: Fourth-year standing and successful completion of Pharmacy 702 and 712
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Spring/Summer
Pharmacy 788 (formerly 688 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 2
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Spring/Summer
Pharmacy 789 (formerly 689 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 3
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Spring/Summer
Pharmacy 790 (formerly 690 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 4
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 791 (formerly 691 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 5
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 792 (formerly 692 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 6
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Pharmacy 793 (formerly 693 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 7
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 794 (formerly 694 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 8
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 795 (formerly 695 )
Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience 9
(Credits: 4)

See Pharmacy 787

Prerequisites: Fourth Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Winter
Pharmacy 799
Curricular Practical Project
(Credits: 1)

A practical work experience related to the field of Pharmacy and consultation with a faculty advisor.   Students enrolled are participating in a work experience directly related to their academic studies during which they are consulting with a University profession in the filed.  At the end of the work experience, the student submits a paper which relates employment opportunity to the enhancement of his or her academic studies to the consulting professor to receive credit for the course.

Prerequisites: Permission Required
Instructor:
Terms: Fall/Winter
Social and Administrative Sciences 574
Investigations in Pharmacy Administration
(Credits: 1-6)

Original investigation of a laboratory or library problem to be selected after consultation with the instructor. A paper is required.

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Social and Administrative Sciences 715
Medication Adherence
(Credits: 2)

Medication Use Behaviors of Patients: An Application of Psychosocial Theories - Patient medication use behavior when managing chronic conditions are discussed using relevant psychosocial theories.  Students gain an understanding in using a theory-based approach to address patient challenges with medication adherence.

Prerequisites: Permission required for PharmD students
Instructor: Farris
Terms: Winter
Social and Administrative Sciences 724
Patient Reported Outcomes
(Credits: 2)

This course provides a broad foundation in outcomes research, with a special emphasis on patient-reported outcomes.  This includes the concepts and measurement of health-related quality of life, patient satisfaction, medication adherence, and other concerns of patients.

Prerequisites: Graduate or PharmD Students
Instructor: Erickson
Terms:
Social and Administrative Sciences 725
Managing the Medication Use System
(Credits: 2)

This course examines the medicine use system within the framework of continuous quality improvement. Students will gain familiarity with the basic concepts of quality improvement and learn how these concepts can be used to improve the quality of medication use in collaboration with patients, physicians, pharmacists, administrators and regulators.

Prerequisites: Graduate or Third Year PharmD Students
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Social and Administrative Sciences 726
Pharmaceutical Health Services Research
(Credits: 2)

This course is an advanced-level seminar on the concepts, methods and problem areas addressed by pharmaceutical/health services research as a field of inquiry.  The focus of the course is on the development and critique of a health services research proposal.

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Social and Administrative Sciences 780
Advanced Topics in Social and Administrative Sciences
(Credits: 1-3)

An indepth discussion of selected pharmacy and medication related issues. Students will be expected to provide in-class presentations and/or write a paper.

Prerequisites: Graduate students or permission of instructor
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall
Social and Administrative Sciences 839
Seminar in Social and Administrative Sciences
(Credits: 3)

Reports on current studies in social and administrative sciences in pharmacy.


Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Social and Administrative Sciences 870
Research Methods in the Behavioral Sciences [Cross listed with Business Administration 870]
(Credits: 3)

Advanced methods in behavioral research focusing on the use of structural equation models.

Prerequisites: Graduate student standing
Instructor: Bagozzi
Terms: Winter
Social and Administrative Sciences 990
Dissertation/Precandidacy
(Credits: 2-8)

Election for dissertation work by doctoral students not yet admitted to candidacy. This course is elected through the Pharmacy degree program in the Rackham School of Graduate studies.

Prerequisites: Advanced doctoral student status
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter
Social and Administrative Sciences 995
Dissertation/Candidacy
(Credits: 4-8)

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student admitted to candidacy. This course is elected through the Pharmacy degree program in the Rackham School of Graduate studies.

Prerequisites: Doctoral candidacy
Instructor: Staff
Terms: Fall/Winter